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Student Photo Bank

The images below are for use by students and educators for school-based projects only. Any other use, commercial or non-commercial, is prohibited and considered a violation of the individual photographer's copyright.

* To download an image, click Zoom to enlarge. On Windows PC, right-click on image and save. On Mac, ctrl click and save.

Image of A diver's view of a cavern opening in a sinkhole.Zoom+ A diver's view of a cavern opening in a sinkhole. © Wes SkilesImage of A young manatee nursing.Zoom+ A young manatee nursing. © Wes Skiles
 
Image of Diver explores the waters of Volusia Blue SpringZoom+ Diver explores the waters of Volusia Blue Spring FDEPImage of One of several "karst" windows that comprise Suwannee Blue, a series of sinkholes that lead to the Suwannee River. This karst window is about the size of a refrigerator.Zoom+ One of several "karst" windows that comprise Suwannee Blue, a series of sinkholes that lead to the Suwannee River. This karst window is about the size of a refrigerator. © Russell Sparkman
 
Image of Cave diver and springs explorer Wes Skiles in his element.Zoom+ Cave diver and springs explorer Wes Skiles in his element. © Jill HeinerthImage of Ichetucknee main spring.Zoom+ Ichetucknee main spring.
 
Image of On a hot summer day, nothing takes the heat away better than tubing down one of Florida's cool, clear spring-fed rivers.Zoom+ On a hot summer day, nothing takes the heat away better than tubing down one of Florida's cool, clear spring-fed rivers. © Ichetucknee Springs State ParkImage of Many unique tours and events, like the famous mermaids of Weeki Wachee Springs, have attracted visitors from around the world for years.Zoom+ Many unique tours and events, like the famous mermaids of Weeki Wachee Springs, have attracted visitors from around the world for years. © Wes Skiles
 
Image of Protection of sinkholes like Rose Sink is essential to long-term springs protection initiatives.Zoom+ Protection of sinkholes like Rose Sink is essential to long-term springs protection initiatives. © Wes SkilesImage of Julie Henson, production assistant for the Water's Journey film, climbs out of Vampire Sinkhole in Alachua County. These unique geologic formations connect directly to the aquifer and also provide information about the past.Zoom+ Julie Henson, production assistant for the Water's Journey film, climbs out of Vampire Sinkhole in Alachua County. These unique geologic formations connect directly to the aquifer and also provide information about the past. © Russell Sparkman
 
Image of Overuse of fertilizers and pesticides and extensive irrigation of lawns can harm springs.Zoom+ Overuse of fertilizers and pesticides and extensive irrigation of lawns can harm springs. © Russell SparkmanImage of Runoff from parking lots can add pollutants to the springshed © Russell SparkmanZoom+ Runoff from parking lots can add pollutants to the springshed © Russell Sparkman © Russell Sparkman
 
Image of Cavern diving in spring pools and areas with overhead restrictions offer recreational divers an opportunity to see many of the rare plants and animals of the springs up-close.Zoom+ Cavern diving in spring pools and areas with overhead restrictions offer recreational divers an opportunity to see many of the rare plants and animals of the springs up-close. © Wes SkilesImage of Glass bottom boat tours at Silver Springs began in the late 1870s to showcase the crystal clear water and the diversity of the aquatic ecosystem found there.Zoom+ Glass bottom boat tours at Silver Springs began in the late 1870s to showcase the crystal clear water and the diversity of the aquatic ecosystem found there. © Harley Means / FDEP
 
Image of Gopher Turtles, such as this juvenile, are residents of the sandhill areas that surround springs.Zoom+ Gopher Turtles, such as this juvenile, are residents of the sandhill areas that surround springs. © Russell SparkmanImage of Spring CrayfishZoom+ Spring Crayfish © Wes Skiles
 
Image of Florida spring ecosystems are an attractive habitat for the American alligator.Zoom+ Florida spring ecosystems are an attractive habitat for the American alligator. © Harley Means / FDEPImage of The limpkin forages along the shorelineZoom+ The limpkin forages along the shoreline © Ev Gawenda
 
Image of River CooterZoom+ River Cooter © John MoranImage of Belted KingfisherZoom+ Belted Kingfisher © Jim Stevenson
 
 
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